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Todays best deals: A sub-$50 Gourmia air fryer, $250 off a Samsung Galaxy Book, the first real discount on the 2022 iPad Pro, and more

2023-03-19 06:21:23 author:dointy.com
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Todays best deals: A sub-$50 Gourmia air fryer, $250 off a Samsung Galaxy Book, the first real discount on the 2022 iPad Pro, and more

Check out the best deals from everyone's favorite big box retailers on Nov. 10:

Todays best deals: A sub-$50 Gourmia air fryer, $250 off a Samsung Galaxy Book, the first real discount on the 2022 iPad Pro, and more(图1)

  • BEST HOME DEAL: Gourmia Digital Air Fryer with Guided Cooking (6-quart)(Opens in a new tab)$38 $99.99 (save $61.99)

  • BEST TECH DEAL: Samsung 13.3-inch Galaxy Book Flex2 Alpha QLED Touch-Screen Laptop (Core i5, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$499.99 $849.99 (save $350)


Walmart, Best Buy, and Amazon are fighting for your Benjamins this season. And, we must say, each store is doing a great job. Walmart's first Deals for Days(Opens in a new tab) drop on Monday brought us some of the lowest prices we've seen on kitchen appliances and floor care products (many of which are still live). Best Buy has been steadily handing out tech deals like they're candy since October. And Amazon keeps on mixing up a little bit of everything for a pot full of tasty savings.

We can certainly expect the deals to keep rolling in for the rest of the holiday season, but here are the best ones you can shop on Nov. 10.

Best home deal

(Opens in a new tab)
Credit: Gourmia
Gourmia Digital Air Fryer with Guided Cooking (6-Quart) (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)
$38 at Walmart (save $61.99)
(opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)

Back on the shelves after selling out, Walmart's Black Friday deal on the Gourmia Digital Air Fryer is nearly too good to be true. Its six-quart capacity can feed a whole family, while its 12 preset one-touch cooking functions and guided cooking feature make whipping up meals a breeze. The basket-style fryer is regularly $100, but you can pick it up at Walmart for only $38 if you act fast. There's no telling how long the deal will stick around this time.

More home deals

  • Cuisinart 12 -Piece Multi-Color Knife Set(Opens in a new tab)$12.99 $49.99 (save $37)

  • Keurig K-Express Essentials Single Serve Coffee Maker(Opens in a new tab)$35 $79.99 (save $44.99)

  • Gourmia Digital Air Fryer with Guided Cooking (6-quart)(Opens in a new tab)$38 $99.99 (save $61.99)

  • Bella Pro Series Digital Air Fryer with Divided Basket (8-quart)(Opens in a new tab)$49.99 $109.99 (save $60)

  • Instant Pot Duo (6-Quart)(Opens in a new tab)$50 $99.99 (save $49.99)

  • Hoover MAXLife PowerDrive Swivel XL Bagless Upright Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$59 $119 (save 60)

  • Shark Wand Vac Cord-Free Handheld Multi Surface Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$64 $99 (save $35)

  • Shark Navigator Lift-Away Upright Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$98 $199 (save $101)

  • Costway Tilt-Head Stand Mixer (7.5-Quart)(Opens in a new tab)$99.99 $178 (save $78.01)

  • Shark Pet Cordless Stick Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$144 $259 (save $115)

  • iRobot Roomba 676 Robot Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$177 $269 (save $92)

  • Shark EZ Robot Vacuum with Self-Empty Base(Opens in a new tab)$258 $449 (save $191)

  • Breville Smart Oven Air Fryer Toaster Oven(Opens in a new tab)$279.95 $349.95 (save $70)

  • iRobot Roomba i1+ (1552) Wi-Fi Connected Self-Emptying Robot Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$288 $529.99 (save $241.99)

  • Dyson Pure Cool Purifying Fan TP01(Opens in a new tab)$299.99 $399.99 (save $100)

  • Breville Smart Oven Air Fryer Pro(Opens in a new tab)$319.95 $499.95 (save $180)

  • Dyson Ball Animal 3 Extra Upright Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$399.99 $499.99 (save $100)

  • iRobot Roomba J7+ Robot Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$599 $799.99 (save $200.99)

Best computer deal

(Opens in a new tab)
Credit: Samsung
Samsung 13.3-inch Galaxy Book Flex2 Alpha QLED Laptop (Intel Core i5, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD) (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)
$499.99 at Best Buy (save $350)
(opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)

Designed to move with you, the Samsung Galaxy Book Flex2 Alpha Laptop is lightweight, slim, and flexible. The magic of its 2-in-1 touch-screen design allows you to go between laptop mode and tablet mode for on-the-go convenience. Meanwhile, its 17-hour battery life ensures all-day capability. It's regularly priced at $849.99 for the 8GB RAM, 256GB storage configuration, but with this daily deal at Best Buy, it's yours for only $499.99. That's $350 in savings.

More computer, tablet, and monitor deals

  • HP 11.6-inch Chromebook (AMD A4, 4GB RAM, 32GB eMMC)(Opens in a new tab)$79 $98 (save $19)

  • Lenovo Tab M8 (3rd Gen) 8-inch Tablet (MediaTek Helio P22T, 3GB RAM, 32GB eMCP)(Opens in a new tab)$79 $119 (save $40)

  • Samsung Galaxy Tab A8 10.5-inch Tablet (WiFi, 32GB)(Opens in a new tab)$159 $229 (save $70)

  • LG 27-inch UltraGear FHD 165Hz Gaming Monitor(Opens in a new tab)$179 $229 (save $50)

  • LG 32-inch UltraGear QHD (2560x1440)165Hz HDR 10 Monitor with FreeSync(Opens in a new tab)$200 $399 (save $199)

  • HP OMEN 27-inch IPS LED QHD FreeSync and G-Sync Compatible Gaming Monitor(Opens in a new tab)$249.99 $399.99 (save $150)

  • ASUS VivoBook 15 OLED K513 (Core i5, 12GB RAM, 512GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$629.99 $799.99 (save $170)

  • ROG Strix G10 Gaming Desktop (Core i5, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$739.99 $1,129.99 (save $390)

  • 2022 Apple 11-inch iPad Pro WiFi (M2, 8GB RAM, 128GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$749 $799 (save $50)

  • Acer Predator Helios 300 15.6-inch FHD 165Hz Gaming Laptop (Intel Core i7, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$999.99 $1,499.99 (save $500)

  • 2021 Apple 12.9-inch iPad Pro WiFi + Cellular (M1, 8GB RAM, 128GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$1,099 $1,299 (save $200)

Audio deals

  • Google Nest Mini (2nd Generation)(Opens in a new tab)$18 $49 (save $31)

  • JBL Flip 4 Waterproof Portable Bluetooth Speaker(Opens in a new tab)$59 $99 (save $40)

  • Samsung Galaxy Buds2 (Lavender)(Opens in a new tab)$85.49 $149.99 (save $64.50)

  • Samsung 170W 2.1ch Soundbar with Wireless Subwoofer(Opens in a new tab)$99 $149 (save $50)

Amazon device deals

  • Ring Video Doorbell Pro and Ring Chime Pro(Opens in a new tab) — $149.99 $219.99 (save $70)

  • Amazon Fire TV 43-inch 4-Series 4K UHD Smart TV(Opens in a new tab)$249.99 $369.99 (save $120)

  • Amazon Fire TV 75-inch Omni Series 4K UHD Smart TV(Opens in a new tab)$599.99 $1,099.99 (save $500)

  • Amazon eero Pro 6E mesh Wi-Fi System(Opens in a new tab)$419 $699 (save $280)

Streaming devices and subscription deals

  • One month of Paramount+(Opens in a new tab)free with code BRAVO $4.99 (save $4.99)

  • One year of Grubhub+(Opens in a new tab)free for Prime members $119.88 (save $119.88)

  • First month of Xbox Game Pass(Opens in a new tab)$1 $14.99 (save $13.99)

  • Four months of Audible Premium Plus(Opens in a new tab)$5.95/month $14.95/month (save $36)

  • Chromecast with Google TV (HD) Streaming Device(Opens in a new tab)$18 $29.99 (save $11.99)

  • Roku Streaming Stick 4K Streaming Device(Opens in a new tab)$24.98 $49 (save $24.02)

  • One year of Paramount+ with Free Fire TV Stick Lite(Opens in a new tab)starting at $24.99 (save 50%)

  • Apple TV HD 32GB (2nd Generation)(Opens in a new tab)$77 $149.99 (save $72.99)

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  • Get a self-emptying robot vacuum with smart mapping for under $100 — plus more of todays top deals

    Get a self-emptying robot vacuum with smart mapping for under $100 — plus more of todays top deals

    We've rounded up the best deals we could find on March 28 — here are some of our top picks:

    (图1)

    • BEST STREAMING DEAL: Showtime on Hulu(Opens in a new tab)$3.99/month $10.99/month (save $21) for three months

    • BEST VACUUM DEAL: Ionvac SmartClean V4 self-emptying robot vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$98 $299.99 (save $201.99)

    • BEST HOME DEAL: GE Profile Opal nugget ice maker + side tank(Opens in a new tab) $428 $579 (save $151)


    We're serving up some tasty deals for you on March 28 — including a sub-$100 self-emptying robot vacuum, a new streaming discount, and a hefty discount on a TikTok-famous gadget. And there's much more where those came from.

    To save you the time and trouble of trying to sort through things on your own, we've rounded up the best deals we could find and sorted them into easily digestible categories. Keep scrolling to check out our top picks.

    Best streaming deal

    (Opens in a new tab)
    Credit: Showtime/Hulu
    Our pick: Showtime on Hulu (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)
    $3.99/month for three months (save $21)
    (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)

    Why we like it

    Through April 16, Hulu users can add Showtime to their streaming account for just $3.99 per month for three months — and that's after a free seven-day trial. Showtime is home to seasons 1 and 2 of Yellowjackets, among other original series like George & Tammy and Your Honor, as well as films like Oscar-winner Everything Everywhere All At Once. After your free trial and three-month subscription end, the Hulu add-on will auto-renew at $10.99 per month. If you don't want to pay full price, be sure to get your binge-watching in before your three-month subscription ends.

    More streaming, subscription, and software deals

    • Apple TV+(Opens in a new tab)free $6.99/month (save $20.97) for three months

    • Apple Music(Opens in a new tab) free $10.99/month (save $43.96) for four months

    • Dashpass(Opens in a new tab)free for Roku users $9.99.month (save $59.94) for six months

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    • HBO Max and Cinemax bundle add-on for Prime Video(Opens in a new tab) — $20.99/month $25.98/month (save $4.99/month)

    • SiriusXM(Opens in a new tab)free $9.99/month (save $39.96) for four months

    • Sling TV(Opens in a new tab)$20/month $40/month (save $20) for your first month

    • Spotify Premium (Opens in a new tab)free $9.99 (save $19.98) for two months

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    • YouTube TV(Opens in a new tab)$62.99/month $72.99/month (save $30) for your first three months

    Best vacuum deal

    (Opens in a new tab)
    Credit: Ionvac
    Our pick: Ionvac SmartClean V4 self-emptying robot vacuum (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)
    $98 at Walmart (save $201.99)
    (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)

    Why we like it

    A self-emptying robot vacuum for less than $100? Count us in. Sitting at its lowest price ever at Walmart — just $98 (reg. $299.99) — the Ionvac SmartClean V4(Opens in a new tab) has an auto-emptying feature that actually makes the cleaning experience hands-off for up to 30 days. It's also packed with smart-mapping technology, which is pretty rare to come across at the sub-$100 price point. There's no telling how long the V4 will be available at this low price, so be sure to grab it ASAP if you're in the market.

    More vacuum deals

    • Shark HS152AMZ UltraLight Pet Plus corded stick vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$149.99 $249.99 (save $100)

    • Dyson Ball Multi Floor Origin upright vacuum(Opens in a new tab) — $199.99 $299.99 (save $100)

    • Dyson V8 Fluffy cordless vacuum(Opens in a new tab) $279.99 $399.99 (save $120)

    • Samsung Jet 75 Pet cordless stick vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$299.99 $399 (save $99.01)

    • Roborock Q5+ robot vacuum(Opens in a new tab) — $499.99 $699.99 (save $200)

    • Samsung Jet Bot AI+ robot vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$646.78 $1,299 (save $652.22)

    • LG CordZero auto empty cordless stick vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$692.16 $999.99 (save $307.83)

    Home deals

    (Opens in a new tab)
    Credit: GE
    Our pick: GE Profile Opal nugget ice maker + side tank (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)
    $428 at Walmart (save $151)
    (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)

    Why we like it

    Two words: nugget ice. The GE Profile Opal(Opens in a new tab) nugget ice maker made a splash on TikTok last year and continues to be a top seller. It's still pretty pricey at $428, but it is $151 cheaper than it normally is. So, if you're looking to produce 24 pounds of perfect ice per day in a hefty countertop appliance, it's a good time to buy. There's a reason this contraption remains at the top of our ice maker list. This one even features a side tank to store up to three times more ice.

    More home deals

    • Ecobee SmartSensor for doors and windows (2-pack)(Opens in a new tab)$59.99 $79.99 (save $20)

    • PowerXL digital air fryer (10-quart)(Opens in a new tab)$69.99 $189.99 (save $120)

    • Ecobee SmartCamera indoor security camera(Opens in a new tab)$79.99 $99.99 (save $20)

    • Ninja NJ601AMZ professional blender(Opens in a new tab)$79.99 $99.99 (save $20)

    • Arlo Essential wireless video doorbell(Opens in a new tab) — $99.99 $199.99 (save $100)

    • Breville Mini Smart toaster oven(Opens in a new tab)$127.95 $179.95 (save $52)

    • Arlo Essential spotlight camera (2-pack)(Opens in a new tab)$159.99 $229 (save $69.01)

    • Ninja BN801 Professional Plus kitchen system(Opens in a new tab) — $169.99 $219.99 (save $50)

    • Anker 521 portable power station(Opens in a new tab)$186.99 $249.99 (save $63)

    • Eufy Security eufyCam 2C Pro 2-camera kit(Opens in a new tab)$199.99 $319.99 (save $120)

    • Ninja IG651 Foodi Smart XL Pro 7-in-1 indoor grill/griddle combo(Opens in a new tab) — $210 $369.99 (save $159.99)

    • Breville Smart Oven Pro toaster oven(Opens in a new tab)$223.95 $349.95 (save $126)

    • Eufy Security S330 Floodlight Cam 2 Pro(Opens in a new tab)$229.99 $299.99 (save $70)

    • Vitamix V1200 Venturist blender(Opens in a new tab)$265.99 $499.99 (save $234)

    • Breville Smart Oven Air Fryer Pro (Opens in a new tab)$319.95 $499.95 (save $180)

    • Lomi composter(Opens in a new tab)$368.91 $499.95 (save $131.04)

    Health and personal care deals

    • Waterpik Aquarius water flosser(Opens in a new tab)$55.49 $99.99 (save $44.50)

    • Hyperice Hypervolt GO percussion massage gun(Opens in a new tab)$99 $199 (save $100)

    • Philips Sonicare ExpertClean 7500 rechargeable electric power toothbrush(Opens in a new tab)$129.99 $199.99 (save $70)

    • Coway Airmega AP-1512HHS app-enabled air purifier(Opens in a new tab)$222.52 $299 (save $76.48)

    • Coway Airmega 400 True HEPA air purifier(Opens in a new tab)$363.85 $749 (save $385.15)

    • Original Peloton bike(Opens in a new tab)$1,245 $1,445 (save $200)

    Audio deals

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    • Google Pixel Buds Pro(Opens in a new tab)$149.99 $199.99 (save $50)

    • JBL Xtreme 2 portable Bluetooth speaker(Opens in a new tab)$179.99 $349.99 (save $170)

    • LG S65Q 3.1ch high-res sound bar(Opens in a new tab) — $196.99 $399.99 (save $203) + $50 Amazon credit with code A4E3I5XORGZS

    • Sony SRS-XG300 X-Series portable Bluetooth party speaker(Opens in a new tab)$198 $349.99 (save $151.99) + 4 free months of Amazon Music Unlimited

    • Bose SoundLink Revolve+ (Series II) portable Bluetooth speaker(Opens in a new tab)$229 $329 (save $100)

    • JBL Boombox 2 portable Bluetooth speaker(Opens in a new tab)$299.95 $449.95 (save $150)

    Computer and monitor deals

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    • ASUS 11.60-inch Vivobook L210 laptop (Intel Celeron N4020, 4GB RAM, 128GB eMMC)(Opens in a new tab)$199.99 $249.99 (save $50) + one year of Office 365 Personal

    • Acer Chromebook Spin 314 convertible laptop (Intel Pentium Silver N6000, 4GB RAM, 128GB eMMC)(Opens in a new tab) — $269.99 $379.99 (save $110)

    • Acer Chromebook Spin 513 convertible laptop (Qualcomm Snapdragon 7c, 8GB RAM, 64GB eMMC)(Opens in a new tab)$349.99 $459.99 (save $110)

    • HP Envy Desktop (Intel Core i9, 16GB RAM, 1TB SSD) with keyboard and mouse(Opens in a new tab)$1,229.99 $1,699.99 (save $470)

    Apple device deals

    • Apple AirPods (2nd Gen)(Opens in a new tab) — $89.99 $129.99 (save $40)

    • Apple Watch Series 8 (GPS + Cellular, 41mm)(Opens in a new tab)$429 $499 (save $70)

    • Apple Watch Series 8 (GPS + Cellular, 45mm)(Opens in a new tab)$459 $529 (save $70)

    • 2020 MacBook Air 13-inch laptop (M1 chip, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$799.99 $999 (save $199.01)

    • 2021 MacBook Pro 14-inch laptop (M1 Pro chip, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$1,599 $1,999 (save $400)

    • 2021 MacBook Pro 16-inch laptop (M1 Pro chip, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$1,999 $2,499 (save $500)

    • 2021 MacBook Pro 16-inch laptop (M1 Pro chip, 16GB RAM, 1TB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$2,199 $2,699 (save $500)

    • 2021 MacBook Pro 16-inch laptop (M1 Max chip, 32GB RAM, 1TB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$2,799 $3,499 (save $700)

    Amazon device deals

    • Fire TV Stick(Opens in a new tab)$19.99 $39.99 (save $20 with code NEW23)

    • Fire TV Stick 4K(Opens in a new tab)$24.99 $49.99 (save $25 with code UP4K23)

    • Fire TV Stick 4K Max(Opens in a new tab)$34.99 $54.99 (save $20 with code UP4KMAX23)

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  • Lakers fan celebrates NBA title win from inside giant bubble

    Lakers fan celebrates NBA title win from inside giant bubble

    It's been a big night for LA Lakers fans.

    (图1)

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    Following the game, a number of fans took to Downtown LA to celebrate the win, gathering in a crowd which eventually prompted a police response(Opens in a new tab).

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  • Dunkins new Spicy Ghost Pepper Donut is childs play

    Dunkins new Spicy Ghost Pepper Donut is childs play

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    (图1)

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    The author post-spicy burger eating contest with milkshake and prize (a bottle of Kraken rum). Credit: mashable

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    Receipt displaying one donut order. Credit: mashable
    The surprise double donut. Credit: mashable

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    Did I take these photos in portrait mode? Of course I did. Credit: Mashable

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    As you can tell from my expression, this ~Spicy Ghost Pepper donut~ isn't very spicy. Credit: mashable

    If you're looking to actually watch someone suffer from spice, I'll direct you to my colleague Tim completing the hot chip challenge(Opens in a new tab).

    Post-filming, my roommate tried a bite and said, "I don't know why anyone would want a spicy donut." As that's one of life's unanswerable questions, I couldn't muster a satisfying response. What I do know, though, is the Spicy Ghost Pepper donut(Opens in a new tab) will be available through December — so if you're someone who does want to try a spicy donut, go forth.

    But remember, like the demon doll, it's just child's play.

  • Rudy Giuliani uploaded racist video to YouTube in which hes seen mocking an Asian accent

    Rudy Giuliani uploaded racist video to YouTube in which hes seen mocking an Asian accent

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    (图1)

    Giuliani, President Donald Trump's personal lawyer, interviewed former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer for Giuliani's podcast titled Common Sense on Tuesday. But, as the Daily Beast first spotted(Opens in a new tab), Giuliani's team uploaded an extended video cut of the interview to YouTube. That video included a moment where Spicer was seen logging off, then Giuliani was seen talking with folks off camera. The video has since been set(Opens in a new tab) to private.

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    (图1)

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    What is Outschool?

    Outschool is an online learning platform - a marketplace of online classes for kids - with over 50,000 classes on offer and 7,000 teachers. It’s been around since 2017, and we - along with thousands of other parents desperately trying to motivate their kids via distance learning - discovered it at the end of March.

    In February 2020, Outschool had 80,000 learners; as of August 2020, there were 1.6 million new sign-ups. The platform expanded to the UK, New Zealand and Australia in spring 2020, just as parents were looking for ways to make homeschooling more interesting, structured and feasible.

    My kids’ school wasn’t able to offer any video classes, and it quickly became apparent that while I could engage them on some subjects, I was a pretty chaotic and disorganized teacher. To ensure they were doing a little something every day, we enlisted their grandpa to conduct math lessons with the older two and some early reading with my kindergartner, all via WhatsApp.

    I was particularly worried about my seven-year-old, who refused to pick up a book, and my 10-year-old, who needed some writing practice. The bitter irony of having a mother who’s a writer is that you can’t teach your children anything English-related without ending up in a shouting match. We needed help.

    Outschool was launched by tech entrepreneur Amir Nathoo, and it originally catered to homeschooling parents and their needs. Parents of traditionally schooled children started picking up the classes as extracurriculars after school and on weekends - popular choices at the moment include cooking classes, musical instruments, dance, martial arts and STEM classes.

    Outschool appealed to me off the bat for a few different reasons: I loved that the classes connected my children to others in a virtual Zoom classroom during a time when they weren’t able to see their friends. They could sit at home in London and chat to a child in San Diego and another one in Spain. Learning about where their classmates came from was almost as exciting as the class that would follow.

    In addition, the creativity in the classes shone through. As a parent who believes in passion-based learning, especially when kids can’t physically be at school, I knew that mine wouldn’t be inspired by dry subject matter. Playing stock market games to get interested in math, however? That, I could get behind.

    SEE ALSO: 8 questions to ask about online learning platforms for kids

    Finally, I wanted us to have some form of remote learning in place in case schools wouldn’t be able to reopen in the autumn. Outschool ticked every box for us. From a financial standpoint, I felt I could justify the additional expense since we weren’t spending on any extracurricular activities.

    How does Outschool work?

    Part of the beauty of Outschool is the flexibility, whether you’re looking for a 10-week course or need to fill an hour this coming Friday afternoon so you can schedule a work call. Parents and kids can choose from over 50,000 live classes in small groups (up from just 15,000 classes on offer a few months ago).

    There are a few different types of live Zoom classes you can sign the kids up for:

    • Ongoing courses: These meet once a week via live video, and you can join any week.

    • Multi-day/semester long courses: These typically run for up to eight weeks and involve longer-term assignments and projects.

    • Camps: These tend to meet multiple times across a few weeks

    • One-time classes: These meet once at a prescribed time

    You can also enroll your child in Flexible Schedule classes, which are ideal if they would prefer to follow the course in their own timeframe, or would rather not take part in the live Zoom sessions.

    How much does Outschool cost?

    Outschool classes range in price from $4 for a 25-minute class on all things Spiderman - through to $100+ for classes that run once a week for a couple of months. The average cost is $10-$15 dollars per class.

    In our experience, while classes that meet on several occasions are more expensive upfront, they tend to be a better value in the long run, since the children become more involved in the topics they’re studying.

    In addition to the class fees, you'll also have to supply the materials for the classes. These could be Lego bricks, a certain book, or crafts and baking supplies, so factor that into the cost.

    SEE ALSO: The best online learning platforms for kids

    How do I find classes I want to take?

    Outschool is very much an “interest-led” platform. Type in whatever your child enjoys – chickens, Jane Austen, Roblox, Hamilton - and find a class that relates to it.

    Some super in-demand classes at the moment include Metrocraft(Opens in a new tab) (creating and governing a Minecraft city), Introduction to Mindfulness(Opens in a new tab) and Beginning Piano.(Opens in a new tab)

    You can also search by class teacher. If you find one whose classes you enjoy you can add them to your favorites (just “heart” them) and you’ll be emailed when they next have a class available.

    Parents leave reviews for classes and teachers so you can get a sense of the overall experience and expectations. Teachers with five-star reviews tend to see their classes book up quickly, however, you can request additional times or modules if your child is desperate to take a particular class that doesn’t currently fit your schedule. You can also request new classes that aren’t on the current curriculum via email.

    Meagan Tauber is a mother of three based in Austin, Texas, who has been an Outschool parent for the past three years and teaches classes on the site, too. She jokes that her children’s favourite teachers, Tammy Wenhame and David Salch, are other parental figures for her children since her kids insist on taking every class they offer.

    Tauber uses Outschool as the “spine of our formal/structured learning experience,” since she homeschools her kids, preferring the multi-week and ongoing classes for the repetition and because they allow her kids to build relationships with other learners.

    In addition to being a fan of the “interest-led” approach that Outschool offers, which allows kids to explore their favorite subjects from every angle, Tauber notes the convenience factor as a positive for big families.

    “The area we last lived in for my husband’s job was a bit more remote and most activities involved a 30-45 minutes drive each way. How do I pull that off with three kids of different ages and different interests? We aren’t a family that overschedules, but even if each child just has one ‘thing’ they’re into… that’s a lot of driving!” she says.

    Inspiring kids academically through creative outlets

    My kids have spent the past seven months taking various classes on Outschool, and we’ve barely scratched the surface of what’s on offer.

    No matter how obscure of a query we typed into the search bar, there seemed to be a class on that topic. My oldest child was keen to do something Harry Potter-related and we found class after class on everything from Harry Potter potions (aka chemistry) to Harry Potter coding. We settled on a Harry Potter-themed creative writing class based around The Chamber of Secrets, taught by Professor Oyo, which met flexibly for 10 weeks.

    Outschool’s Flexible classes don’t have live Zoom sessions but encourage student feedback and participation. My daughter submitted creative writing assignments twice a week and enjoyed the class, but begged me to put her in a live one when she finished the course.

    She’s now done everything from a Percy Jackson-themed Greek gods course to a class on feminism through the lens of pop culture. In that class, taught by university professor Liz Boltz Ranfeld, she learned about agency and objectification in The Babysitter’s Club and Hamilton. As the youngest student in the class, a lot of it went over her head but she loved it and I can see her starting to analyze movies and TV with a critical gaze. Score!

    We also had amazing success finding classes for my seven-year-old, enrolling her on a month-long course called U.S. History through the Eyes of the American Girl Dolls, taught by an inspiring, creative and nurturing teacher, Monica Kelly.

    We didn’t own any of the American Girl dolls ahead of taking the class, but it turned out that didn’t matter. My daughter – the one who wouldn’t pick up a book prior to Outschool – was suddenly reading daily, absorbing the world of Felicity, a nine-year-old living during the time of the American Revolution (she can also tell you all about Josefina, a girl in New Mexico in the 1850s). While libraries were closed, we ordered the books online, although we also got lucky when American Girl started posting free books online throughout lockdown(Opens in a new tab).

    I have never seen my seven-year-old so engaged or passionate. She is continuing to enjoy reading, as well as learning about a new period in history, the Victorian era, through American Girl Samantha’s eyes, in her third class with Ms. Monica, which started in August (my daughter spent last weekend writing up her project on children working in factories, which she’s been researching independently). I often catch myself listening in on the classes, which combine literature, history and hands-on projects, like bread-making and weaving with other interesting anecdotes - like a photo of a shark egg Ms. Monica found on the beach near her home that week.

    Social interaction via Zoom

    For us, there was an added bonus to signing up for Outschool: While the platform serves kids in over 200 countries, since it’s US-based, there are a lot of children from across the States enrolled.

    I’m American, and we haven’t been able to visit the States in a while, so it’s important to me that my kids are exposed to other American and international children where possible.

    What ages are Outschool classes good for?

    The success of Outschool with my older children prompted me to try a couple of classes with my five-year-old. We enrolled in a couple of Lego workshops, but with less success. While she’ll usually play with Lego independently for hours, she needed a lot of help from me as soon as we got online, which wasn’t ideal when I needed to work.

    Outschool classes are available for kids aged three and up, but based on our experiences I would recommend them for kids who are six or older, unless you want to be participating throughout. For teens up to the age of 18, there are a variety of classes on offer, covering everything from SAT prep to prom makeup.

    While Outschool hasn’t been quite so amazing for our little ones, it’s made such an impact that I can’t imagine it not being part of our future educational experience, pandemic or not.

    My family isn’t alone in this obsession: another London-based friend, Nicola, enrolled her 10-year-old daughter in an ongoing creative writing class which met once a week, and was impressed by her daughter’s enthusiasm for the course - she’s normally tepid about writing - as well as her improvement and enhanced confidence after a few weeks.

    Can I log into a conference call next door while my child is on Outschool?

    Outschool is a helpful solution for working parents who want their children to be engaged in learning, but who can’t supervise them when they need to get some work done themselves. Younger kids will likely need parental help in certain classes, especially if they have props of some kind, and we have occasionally had to assist with art projects the older kids were doing.

    Also, you really need to be comfortable with having your child on Zoom; children can’t access the Zoom class until their teacher has entered the virtual classroom, but, depending on the class and teacher’s discretion, they can send messages via Zoom chat.

  • The San Francisco Zoos stolen lemur saga gets a weird, happy ending

    The San Francisco Zoos stolen lemur saga gets a weird, happy ending

    Every week in 2020 has felt like a horrible involuntary adventure, but Maki the ring-tailed lemur's experience being lemur-napped from the San Francisco Zoo, becoming the subject of a citywide missing primate initiative, escaping from his captors, and finally seeking refuse at a church before being returned to the zoo "agitated, dehydrated and hungry" sounds like hell for anyone.

    (图1)

    Maki, who at 21 years of age is a lemur elder at the San Francisco Zoo, began his crappy week when zoo authorities reported him missing and possibly kidnapped after a burglary attempt in their primate enclosure. The San Francisco Police Department put out an alert for citizens to keep an eye out for Maki and later confirmed that he had, in fact, been stolen instead of having simply escaped during the burglary

    The Executive Vice President of Animal Behavior and Wellness at the SF Zoo said in a statement that Maki's capture may have been due to the lemur's advanced age, saying that the 21-year old elder was "one of the slowest, and we believe, likely, the easiest to catch" in a statement to ABC News(Opens in a new tab).

    SEE ALSO: Unruly lemurs torment reporter attempting to film segment

    In one of this story's odder twists, the primary suspect in Maki's kidnapping is Cory McGilloway, a 30-year-old who was arrested two days later on charges unrelated to the theft and will now face more charges including burglary, vandalism, and grand theft of an animal on top of whatever else he was arrested for.

    At some point between the break-in at the zoo and McGilloway's arrest, Maki either escaped or McGilloway released him, as a sharp eyed five-year-old student at the Hope Lutheran Day School spotted Maki in the parking lot the same day police took the suspect into custody.

    The five-year old and his classmates watched as Maki took up temporary residence on the church's school playground and was eventually recaptured by police, who returned the lemur to the zoo.

    Zoo director Tanya Peterson told the AP(Opens in a new tab) that Maki would have to be nursed back to health after his harrowing ordeal, describing his medical seclusion as "socially distancing from his primate family." The San Francisco Zoo hopes Maki will make a full recovery, which would be a nice bit of news for a lemur who has clearly seen things no lemur was meant to see.

    Between the saved lemur and the cute kid who found him, this is 2020 serving up a rare example of good news. And of course, Maki's sudden celebrity also made him the subject of a parody Twitter account(Opens in a new tab).

  • Does monogamy work? This new book explores the controversial question.

    Does monogamy work? This new book explores the controversial question.

    Unlike what you may have been told, monogamy isn't inherent to human biology. Moreover, it's not inherent to many animals in nature: Less than three percent of mammals in the animal kingdom are reported to be monogamous.

    (图1)

    This is just one fascinating fact of many in Luke Brunning's Does Monogamy Work?(Opens in a new tab), publishing in the U.S. on Oct. 20. Brunning(Opens in a new tab), a philosopher and lecturer of ethics at the University of Birmingham, told Mashable he was recommended to write the book for Thames & Hudson's Big Ideas(Opens in a new tab) series, as his research focuses on relationships, sexuality, and emotions like jealousy — all topics that are relevant when discussing (non-)monogamy.

    The book's format is similar to that of a textbook, complete with color images on nearly every page, annotations on the sides, and paragraphs in varying sized-fonts. Does Monogamy Work? is like a syllabus reading for a class I wish existed in college. Even better, perhaps, that it's not: You can enjoy the subject, writing, and images at your leisure without worrying about a grade.

    In Does Monogamy Work?, Brunning provides a primer on the history of monogamy; challenges to monogamy; what monogamy currently looks like and can look like; and the problems and possibilities for non-monogamous relationships. It's publishing at a fitting time, where more people may be considering non-monogamy post-pandemic (whenever that may be).

    Read our interview with Brunning below.

    The book's cover Credit: Courtesy of Thames & Hudson
    The author Credit: Courtesy of Luke Brunning

    Mashable: How did you decide to introduce the book with the history of monogamy, then go into its challenges and that of non-monogamy?

    Brunning: It was a discussion between me and Thames & Hudson. My disciplinary background is philosophy, so I'm interested in a lot more normative questions about how we ought to treat each other [and] whether there are any kind of ethical problems with monogamy and non-monogamy. The publisher wanted a bit of context to that — why is monogamy so dominant? Has it always been that way? So between us, we settled on the structure so it has a mixture of both those things.

    I think you did a great job in distilling the history of monogamy. I can't imagine how difficult it was to do in just a few pages [the chapter, "The Origins of Monogamy," is 29 pages] but you did it.

    It was quite a painful process for me because in a sense, you're leaving so much out and you know there's so many interesting things you can't say and a lot of complexity that's off the page. Hopefully [the chapter] has done a reasonable job of showing that there's a lot more to think about monogamy than people commonly suppose.

    SEE ALSO: The best sex, erotica, dating, and relationship podcasts

    That was certainly the case for me. One of the most shocking details for me was the role that slavery played in monogamy in the ancient world(Opens in a new tab).

    I think people don't think about it [monogamy] in that context anymore. Societies that often developed quite elaborate ideals of marriage or monogamy or conduct between men and women were often societies that had huge numbers of people working as slaves or indentured servants. A lot of that labor was being done by the people, which created a kind of public space where people could think about equality and how to treat women and so on.

    I read this book shortly after reading Ace. The author, Angela Chen, discusses the social hierarchy we've placed on romantic love over friendship, and you touch on this a little bit in Does Monogamy Work? Do you think this hierarchy happened for the same reasons monogamy became the western ideal?

    Definitely in the sense that the encompassing modern, post-Romantic ideals of monogamy where it's not simply that you form a partnership with one other person, or that you look to secure a way to make sure your property is inherited by one other family, right? It's now a much more demanding emotional and social and kind of political ideal, but I think that's a relatively modern development. It has historical antecedents, but it's relatively modern.

    It was kind of catalyzed after the Romantic period, the 18th century, and I think it is related. This idea of "love" as something that offers a real important, central source of value to life that is better than — or more intense than — other kinds of value is relatively modern in that sense. I think it's problematic because I just don't think it's true, to be honest. But it's something we're still kind of coming to terms with. I think a lot of people that are pushing back against the dominance of modern monogamy are also doing that because they think that we're neglecting other kinds of relationship.

    Does Monogamy Work? is publishing during a pandemic, and I'm fascinated as to how this is going to change everything. You mentioned the first and second demographic transitions(Opens in a new tab) [historical shifts in birth and mortality rates] in the book — do you think this could possibly be a third? A non-monogamous relationship coach I talked to said she thought more people are going to be non-monogamous when the pandemic is "over" — do you think the pandemic will impact marriage and monogamy?

    I don't really know, is the honest answer. It's interesting when you look at big social upheavals, [they] often have an impact in the decade after on people's behavior. The Second World War, for example, seemed to really catalyze this image of "the home," this domestic refuge away from the chaos of war. People came back from war, wanted to have families and children, and embraced this consumer capitalist lifestyle. Being at their home with all their appliances and raising a family.

    "It's interesting when you look at big social upheavals, [they] often have an impact in the decade after on people's behavior."

    I'm wondering, will this period of upheaval make people rethink their personal relationships in some way? I don't know, it's hard to say. One thing that seems to be going on, at least in the UK, is a resurging interest or appreciation of community in a broader sense. People are interacting with their neighbors and they're starting to realize those social interactions are really significant. I'm wondering whether the kind of isolated nuclear family ideal will get a little bit weaker because people are realizing there are many sources of social interaction — and when we don't have access to those wider networks of community, our wellbeing suffers.

    I'm a bit skeptical about whether there'll be a straightforward relationship between these kinds of pandemics and non-monogamy. I know that government restrictions on movement and people contacting each other have affected non-monogamous people because often they're not able to see partners in the way that families are. Maybe that will have some kind of consequence where people start to become more vocal about being able to have parity; they won't be able to access their partners the same way that married people can.

    At the same time, I think those changes are happening anyway, they were already happening. People were rethinking family life. Even people with monogamous romantic aspirations have complicated families, they were making more time for friends and colleagues.

    This is a period of flux but I think these times of stress often reinforce or bring to light tensions that are already there rather than necessarily generating new ones.

    Living in New York City, non-monogamous relationships aren't really a novelty for me; I've dated people in them, and see "ethically non-monogamous" in a lot of Tinder bios — but some triads have been on TV(Opens in a new tab) as if this is a novelty. I wonder if perspectives on non-monogamy on the whole will shift after this.

    We hope so. Maybe as people will become more familiar, it'll become less interesting and less extraordinary — a bit like what happened with same-sex relationships to some extent. As people become familiar with this, they become more used to it.

    I think, actually, that the majority of people are relatively indifferent to the kind of romantic lives of others; they're tolerant by and large. The interesting thing for me is not whether people get used to seeing these representations, but what that means with respect to how people are treated in society. People might think, 'Oh okay, some small minority people live this way but we don't need to change anything, we don't need to make any kind of practical social, legal changes to accommodate them.' But for me the interesting question is, over time there's going to be increasing pressure on existing marriage laws or other kinds of legal protections — employment, immigration and so on — [that] non-monogamous people are going to start agitating for. They're going to be able to access those things. I think that may be the potential flash points in the future.

    open relationships Credit: vicky leta / mashable

    Going back to what you said about community, I wonder if western society will shift towards being community-based over being individualistic, which also goes into monogamy and marriage.

    There are many different ways people might want to be non-monogamous. For some people, it's a way of being an individual right? It's a way of seeking personal fulfillment, emotional or sexual fulfillment, personal challenge, whatever. But for other people, it is very much entered into as a communal emphasis.

    There's two broad ways of approaching it. They're existing now and they've always existed in some sense, people's kind of romantic inclinations tend to one or the other of those views. But I think that different groups of non-monogamous people may emphasize the communal aspect of the individual or whatever, but they're both there.

    It's unclear to me whether one will become more predominant than the other, or whether the pandemic will really impact it. I'm a bit skeptical just because I think it impacts different people in different ways depending on what they already value. Maybe for the individualists, they're just waiting for [the pandemic] to get over with so they can get back to normal whereas other people are more likely to think, 'Actually, maybe I really do appreciate my neighbors much more than I used to. I want to be more involved with my community.' But maybe if it lasts much longer, it would have more lingering effects.

    In the book and in your work, you discuss the concept of jealousy and compersion(Opens in a new tab) [the "opposite" of jealousy, being happy for your partner being with someone else]. Is jealousy an inevitable part of non-monogamy, or if it's possible to get to a place of full compersion?

    I've written about this recently(Opens in a new tab) and tried to think about it in more detail. What I've put in the book [is] based on this academic article(Opens in a new tab) I published on compersion, where I'm thinking through those questions.

    It's interesting because [some] people think jealousy is inevitable and you can never get rid of it. Other people take a completely different view and think it's easy. The emotion is linked to two things. One is our sense of personal vulnerability. The other is our beliefs about what we're entitled to, what we expect from other people, what we deserve — a cognitive understanding of what relationships are and how they should work.

    It's relatively easy — though maybe not as easy as people wish — to change your beliefs about relationships. You might think, 'Well, I've had all these dodgy beliefs about what I can expect from a partner or what I'm entitled to or how they should behave.' And so, change your kind of attitudes in that way.

    "Emotions that are comparative like jealousy are deeply rooted in processes and traits that aren't always very easy to change."

    At the same time, the fact that you've changed those beliefs — you feel less entitled, you don't think that you possess your partner, you don't think can claim their attention — doesn't necessarily mean that you can alter — or alter quickly — your personal vulnerability, the way those beliefs have been functioning, [or] the way you get attached to people. A lot of these other aspects of our psychology are quite resistant to rational change, and they take a lot longer to change.

    I know lots of people who've thought about this a lot, and they've got a clear sense of what they think is justified or not justified, and they think jealousy is not justified, that they're not possessive, that other people aren't rivals that they should be afraid of — but nonetheless they feel horrifically insecure and vulnerable.

    Emotions that are comparative like jealousy are deeply rooted in processes and traits that aren't always very easy to change. So it may be the case that it's actually quite hard for people to experience compersion. I don't think that's a problem, necessarily. So much depends on the individual. There's no one-size-fits-all approach to it.

    Does Monogamy Work?(Opens in a new tab) is on sale in the U.S. starting on Oct. 20.

    This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

  • Ive become a Boyfriend Girl and I dont know what to do about it

    Ive become a Boyfriend Girl and I dont know what to do about it

    In Party for One, Mashable explores single life in 2020, from Carly Rae Jepsen’s iconic single anthems, to the beauty of alone time, and the fascinating history behind the single positivity movement.

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    I received some devastating personal news recently: I'm a Boyfriend Girl now. This diagnosis, given by a trusted colleague and corroborated by several others, sent me into an existential spiral.

    Nobody wants to be the dreaded Boyfriend Girl, who seemingly mistakes being in a relationship for a whole personality. But if it can happen to me, it can happen to anyone. I may be biased, but I do think there's something to learn from the Boyfriend Girl, if only as part of the larger cultural phenomenon of how and why we perform our relationship statuses (or lack thereof) online.

    But where the Wife Guy fundamentally differs from the Boyfriend Girl lies in the gender norms they're in conversation with.

    To the uninitiated, the Boyfriend Girl is only one iteration of the extremely committed online, best understood in the ever-evolving internet taxonomy as a lady equivalent to the Wife Guy(Opens in a new tab) (as encapsulated by the curvy wife guy(Opens in a new tab), elf wife guy(Opens in a new tab), and fake wife guy(Opens in a new tab)). An outdated 2011 Urban Dictionary entry(Opens in a new tab) for Boyfriend Girl mischaracterizes her more as your classic serial monogamist, mentioning a prevalence of "MySpace style" pictures with said beau. In 2020, though, the Boyfriend Girl is less defined by her previous dating history and more by her online broadcasting of said relationship as central to her social media identity.

    Today, you can recognize a Boyfriend Girl by how her Instagram grid shows a sudden, immediate takeover by some man she's now always pictured smiling and/or making goo-goo eyes at him. Her Instagram stories range from capturing their small moments of love to date nights and vacations. On Facebook, her relationship status is no mystery either, as he's a mainstay of not only her profile pic but featured pics too, along with further photographic evidence of their coupling on her feed.

    SEE ALSO: Carly Rae Jepsen's single anthems shine among her love-heavy discography

    There are more similarities between the Wife Guy and the Boyfriend Girl than I'd care to admit, namely the undercurrent of aggressive heteronormative monogamy. But where the Wife Guy fundamentally differs from the Boyfriend Girl lies in the gender norms they're in conversation with.

    It's why, before, even the potential risk of becoming a Boyfriend Girl so repulsed me that I carefully crafted a whole online personality on the sole basis of the abject rejection of her.

    For as long as I've been Extremely Online, my internet persona could be best summed up as the Slutty Single Girl.

    Prior to the current relationship that onset my Boyfriend Girlhood, I'd only been in one other committed relationship my entire life (in high school, which barely counts). For years, I mined my abysmal online dating(Opens in a new tab) and voracious sex life for not only Twitter content but also my very job as a sex and dating writer. A proud member of the bravely Horny on Main, I traded in the "urgh, men!" web discourse(Opens in a new tab) — the love language of most single women sexually attracted to men and hating it. I was so devoted to my singlehood that I saw it as some vague feminist virtue signaling, as if not having a boyfriend was my political choice or statement.

    A change in life circumstances necessarily changed this online identity I'd curated around a lifetime of singlehood. Over the past year, I slowly became my own worst nightmare. My Twitter is now consumed by cutesy domestic disputes, pranks, and (even more sickeningly) unironic appreciation posts for my partner. Whenever I try to post anything akin to the Slutty Single Girl of old, my boyfriend will comment on it — inevitably making the original joke much funnier, to my utter dismay.

    After years of using singlehood as a bat signal, celebrating my un-date-ability as an act of feminism and railing against gendered stereotypes of women desperate for commitment, I'm faced with an uncomfortable truth: Whatever emancipation from the patriarchy I thought my old online persona stood for was a total fraud. Though it physically pains me to say it, the Boyfriend Girl I am today is a more honest expression of who I am and what I've always wanted IRL.

    Because in all my years of loud, public displays of singlehood online, I wasn't just trying to sell everyone else on the narrative that I was better off alone. I was trying to convince myself, too, mortified that in my heart of hearts I actually did sincerely want someone to share my life with.

    The Boyfriend Girl haunted me as the antithesis of how empowered women conducted themselves on the internet.

    The Boyfriend Girl is not a stereotype we talk about much anymore, as mainstream web culture works to evolve beyond policing women for however they choose to express themselves online. But having grown up in the MySpace era when her ephemeral, ghostly presence loomed over my nascent feminism, the Boyfriend Girl haunted me as the antithesis of how empowered women conducted themselves on the internet, long after she mostly left the rest of the internet's collective cultural consciousness.

    The difference in why we hate the Wife Guy today, and why we hated the Boyfriend Girl in the past is telling, though.

    Our ire for the Wife Guy(Opens in a new tab) is entrenched in rejecting the patriarchal possessiveness of marriage as an institution, mixed with the self-aggrandizement of his online displays of wife love — as if his posts are somehow brave or proof that he's an ally to all women. Meanwhile, to quote Urban Dictionary, the ire for the Boyfriend Girl stems instead from how she "uses boys to fill in the emptiness she feels inside" because she "usually has low self-esteem and doesn't see the good inside herself unless a boy (usually the current boyfriend or prospect) notices it."

    We hate — or at least I hated — the Boyfriend Girl because she is an embodiment of women's inability to be truly independent or satisfied with being alone, to outgrow the desire for commitment to a man or fulfillment from heteronormative monogamy. I mean, how radical can your politics be if you're seemingly just a few steps removed from the Stepford Wife?

    But even now, in an online culture where the "self-partnered” singlehood empowerment narrative reigns supreme, being a Boyfriend Girl feels like an unspoken betrayal of needs-no-man feminism. On social media platforms like Twitter, it's far easier to get behind an underdog like the subversive Slutty Single, wantonly finding her own happiness by flashing her tits at patriarchal cultural scripts we’ve been fighting ever since Gloria Steinem sought to normalize the new-fangled feminist moniker of 'Ms' through Ms. Magazine.

    The existential crisis of being coupled in a heterosexual relationship is not new, and was a reoccurring issue for many during second-wave feminism too, including for Steinem herself. But I can't help but wonder whether distaste for the Boyfriend Girl — like a lot of second-wave feminism — isn't an outdated overcorrection we need to let go of today.

    As ashamed as I am of it, I must confess that I was pretty miserable when I was single. Despite having a fulfilling career and wonderful friends, there was indeed an emptiness that those accomplishments could not fill. Yet unlike the Urban Dictionary definition of the Boyfriend Girl assumes, the emptiness I felt was not from a lack of male validation. Plenty of men — more men than right now, actually — were validating me as the Slutty Single Girl. Rather, I was miserable because I was lonely, a universal human emotion devoid of gender politics. Yet still, I interpreted my loneliness as weakness, believing a more liberated woman would be strong enough to feel perfectly content with being single.

    View this post on Instagram
    (Opens in a new tab)

    Imma day late and a dollar short, but in case y’all didn’t know, this guy’s it. My player two, father to my children, and beloved pain in my ass ❤️❤️❤️(Opens in a new tab)

    A post shared by Jess Joho(Opens in a new tab) (@jessjoho) on

    It might say more about my own personal baggage than anything else, but it took me years of therapy to even admit to myself that I did, in fact, want a longterm committed relationship.

    But as I wrestle with the death of my former online identity now, I wonder: Is the empowered single woman’s value grounded exclusively in her rejection of social norms? If it is, then she is no more of a three-dimensional person than the woman valued exclusively because she ascribes to those social norms. That's not to say that women can't be single, happy, and thriving. I know plenty who are, including many of the writers in Mashable's Party of One series. But if the counter to the patriarchal pressure to be in a relationship is a newfound pressure to reject relationships, then we're only imposing a different set of countercultural ideals that still don't allow women to experience all the emotions, needs, and wants of full-fledged human beings.

    Like my performance of singlehood in the past, my performance of girlfriendhood now isn't just about convincing other people of something. It's about convincing myself, too. As a Boyfriend Girl compelled to keep posting again and again about her happy relationship, I do so in the hopes that maybe it'll start to feel normal — that I'll feel less like an imposter, more worthy of the kind of healthy, loving relationship I thought only happened to other people.

    It's OK to be single and happy about it. It's OK to be single and unhappy about it, too. Call me a crazed Boyfriend Girl, but it's also OK to be happy in your relationship and to like telling the world about it online.

  • Facebook Dating finally arrives in Europe

    Facebook Dating finally arrives in Europe

    It's a weird time to be dating right now.

    (图1)

    Facebook, nonetheless, is undeterred.(Opens in a new tab) From today, the social network's Facebook Dating platform is expanding to Europe after launching in the U.S. and 19 other countries around the world.

    For the uninitiated, Facebook Dating is an "opt-in space within the Facebook app". You can create a Facebook Dating profile that's separate from your main profile (you'll need to be over 18 and using the most recent version of the app).

    The launch comes nine months after the intended release date was halted(Opens in a new tab) at the 11th hour after a leading data regulator raised concerns about privacy and the processing of personal data. In February, the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC) visited Facebook's Dublin office and flagged that the social media company hadn't given ample information about how Dating would work, and hadn't given the regulator enough notice of the product launch (Facebook gave them just a few days warning). "Facebook has provided detailed clarifications on the processing of personal data in the context of the Dating feature," deputy commissioner Graham Doyle told(Opens in a new tab) TechCrunch. "Facebook has also provided details of changes that they have made to the product to take account of the issues raised by the DPC."

    Facebook Daters have access to several features including Stories, much like you'd share on Instagram or non-dating Facebook. You can also share your existing Facebook or Instagram Story to your dating profile.

    There's also a feature called Secret Crush, which lets you select up to nine of your Facebook friends or Instagram followers who you might be interested in. If your crush adds you to their Secret Crush list, you'll get a match. But if the crush you've selected isn't on Facebook Dating or they didn't add you to their crush list, then they'll never know how you feel. Unless you tell them, of course.

    Virtual Dates are also an option for users — which is to be expected given the current, errr, situation we find ourselves in. Once you've matched with someone and you feel ready to, you have the option of video calling each other. Initiating a call will send an invite, which your match will need to accept before joining the call.

    Much like non-dating Facebook, there are also events and groups, which can help you find people with similar interests.

    SEE ALSO: Tinder launches apocalyptic Swipe Night in the UK and around the world

    There are security measures in place, like the ability to report and block anyone, as well as the prevention of people sending photos, links, payments, or videos in messages. Your Facebook friends won't be informed that you've joined Dating, nor will they be suggested as potential matches.

    In case you're worried about your main Facebook profile being taken over by dating content, fear not. Your Dating profile, messages, and matches won't show up in your Facebook News Feed.

    Facebook Dating is now available in the United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Germany, Spain, Greece, Italy, Belgium, Luxembourg, Bulgaria, Poland, Portugal, Austria, Norway, Switzerland, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Croatia, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Malta, Netherlands, Romania, Sweden, Slovenia, Slovakia, Iceland, and Liechtenstein.

  • Trump drops full 60 Minutes interview early in puzzling attempt to control the narrative

    Trump drops full 60 Minutes interview early in puzzling attempt to control the narrative

    Donald Trump is trying so hard to control his 60 Minutes narrative that he actually released clips from his interview with reporter Lesley Stahl early.

    (图1)

    Trump's 60 Minutes episode is set to air on CBS Sunday night, but on Thursday morning Trump tweeted(Opens in a new tab) that he would be giving "a first in television history full, unedited preview of the vicious attempted 'takeout' interview."

    Since it was reported(Opens in a new tab) that Trump ended his interview with Stahl early on Tuesday, the president has been attacking the anchor on Twitter. He called her out for not wearing a mask, and also claimed she was angry and constantly interrupted his "full, flowing, and 'magnificently' brilliant" responses to her questions.

    On Thursday, a 38-minute clip of the interview was shared to Trump's Facebook page,(Opens in a new tab) alongside the comment, "Look at the bias, hatred and rudeness on behalf of 60 Minutes and CBS. Tonight’s anchor, Kristen Welker, is far worse! #MAGA"

    While Trump argued that "bias, hatred and rudeness" was present throughout the interview, upon watching it's plainly obvious that Stahl is simply doing her job. It's certainly not the exposé that Trump seems to think it is.

    The footage, which according to the (Opens in a new tab)New York Times(Opens in a new tab), was recorded by a member of his staff "for archival purposes." By releasing it on Facebook, the administration broke their agreement with CBS News, per the (Opens in a new tab)Washington Post(Opens in a new tab).

    It only shows the president, but Stahl is heard calmly asking questions about healthcare, the coronavirus, and other pressing campaign issues. In almost every case, he either disputed her (true) statements or refused to give a specific or credible answer. So, as journalists are supposed to do, she repeatedly followed up on those questions in an attempt to get a straight answer. She sticks to the facts and maintains her composure, in spite of him repeatedly saying she's "discredited" herself.

    In more than one instance, however, Trump appears visibly annoyed by Stahl's questions and becomes increasingly defensive as the minutes tick on.

    Towards the end of the interview, Trump tells Stahl that she's making "vicious" statements and eventually confronts her about her "inappropriately brought up" questions.

    “You brought up a lot of questions that were inappropriately brought up, right from the beginning,” Mr. Trump says toward the end of the clip.

    “You're the president, don’t you think you should be accountable to the American people?” Stahl asked Trump.

    He replied by claiming Stahl didn't mention she'd be asking him tough questions when the interview was set up.

    When someone from Trump's team interrupted to give a five-minute time warning, Trump said that they had talked enough and felt it was time to wrap up. He abruptly leaves and did not return to film a planned segment including him and Vice President Pence.

    Though Trump released footage in advance, the full interview is still set to air on Sunday's episode of 60 Minutes, and will feature additional interviews(Opens in a new tab) with Vice President Joe Biden and Senator Kamala Harris.

    Additional reporting by Cassie Murdoch

    Related Video: How to vote in the 2020 presidential election

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  • Introducing Lovehoneys new music-activated sex toys

    Introducing Lovehoneys new music-activated sex toys

    If you think that nothing feels better than singing along to your favorite song at the top of your lungs, think again. Lovehoney’s new Juno collection(Opens in a new tab) features four demure vibrating toys that use synch technology to buzz along to the beat. They’re designed to make your fave songs orgasmic — literally. Here’s the lineup, how the toys work, and how you can save 15% off your next purchase. 

    (图1)

    Toys that rock your world

    Credit: Lovehoney

    Slip the music-activated Juno panty vibrator(Opens in a new tab) into your underwear and make this the best festival season yet, or get busy in the bedroom with the love ring(Opens in a new tab) and lose yourself in the music. The 3.5-inch butt plug(Opens in a new tab) is a great option if you’re new to anal play, and the slim vibrating egg(Opens in a new tab) will take dancing at the club to the next level.

    You don’t need WiFi for a good time

    Credit: Lovehoney

    Since each Juno toy has a USB-rechargeable battery and doesn’t need WiFi or Bluetooth, you can take your toy of choice absolutely everywhere. Simply place the remote next to a music source, like a speaker, and the toy will start buzzing to the rhythm.

    Make your wallet sing too

    Credit: Lovehoney

    Check out the Juno collection(Opens in a new tab), find your favorite toys, and then make your wallet sing too. You can save 15% off orders over $70 using the code, AFF-MASH15OFF70. Considering each Juno toy is regularly $69.99, that means you can pick one up for way less than a festival ticket.

    (Opens in a new tab)
    Credit: Lovehoney
    Save 15% off orders over $70 at Lovehoney (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)
    Use code AFF-MASH15OFF70
    (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)

  • Dont spontaneously FaceTime people and expect them to pick up

    Dont spontaneously FaceTime people and expect them to pick up

    At 4:25 p.m. on New Year's Eve 2020 I got a random, out of the blue FaceTime call from a friend. When my phone started ringing I was wearing pajamas, slippers, and an unflattering fuzzy gray robe. I didn't have any makeup on, I was in the process of removing little hot dogs from the oven, and When Harry Met Sally was on pause in the living room. In other words, I did NOT feel FaceTime ready.

    (图1)

    I know this friend extremely well, so I was confident that the FaceTime request was nothing urgent. I caught one glimpse of my unprepared self in the answering screen, thought "absolutely not," and waited until she hung up.

    My friend is both smart and persistent, so 10 minutes after I dodged her call she saw I posted an Instagram story, correctly assumed I was standing phone-in-hand, and FaceTimed me again. As my finger moved to like an Instagram post I did the unthinkable and accidentally picked up the call.

    We proceeded to video chat for the next 13 minutes, showing off our New Year's Eve appetizer feasts and catching up on our holidays. Ultimately, it was a lovely chat. But would I have found the call significantly more enjoyable if I'd agreed to it beforehand and willingly accepted some sort of invitation? Absolutely!

    Call me boring. Call me old. Call me inflexible. Call me whatever you want. Just do not spontaneously call me on FaceTime and expect me to pick up.

    The anxiety of spontaneous FaceTime calls

    There are so few things we can control in this world, so we should at least have a say in when we video chat with others. Some reckless FaceTime fans may argue, "Oh, it's no big deal. FaceTiming is the same as calling someone on the phone." To that I say, "No ❤️, it really isn't."

    Receiving an unexpected voice call is no big deal. You can seamlessly talk on the phone if you're out in the world, multitasking at home, or lying in bed with your wet hair wrapped in a towel. No one knows what you're doing or what you look like when you're having a regular phone conversation, but the same can't be said for FaceTime calls.

    As with other video chat platforms like Zoom and Google Hangouts, the act of socializing face-to-face with another human being requires an added level of emotional preparedness and energy. If you suffer from social anxiety like I do, video calls are not necessarily something you can just be ready for on a whim.

    When you make the choice to spontaneously FaceTime someone, you're in control. You're ready to be camera, and you've made the choice to partake in this journey, but you need to remember that the person on the other end of the line has done no such thing and there's a good chance they're not in the same headspace as you.

    Are spontaneous FaceTime calls ever OK?

    If you're a member of Gen Z(Opens in a new tab) or have developed a newfound appreciation for video chatting in quarantine(Opens in a new tab), perhaps there's never a bad time to receive a spontaneous FaceTime call. But personally, I can never know how an unexpected FaceTime will be received until my phone screen lights up. It all depends on my mood, my location, the caller, and whether or not I feel up to having an impromptu face-to-face conversation with that person.

    Have I spontaneously FaceTimed a friend before? Sure, but only in a dire social emergency. Otherwise, if I want to FaceTime someone I'll give them the courtesy of a warning text along the lines of "Hey are you free to FaceTime at some point today?" or "Hi! Can I FaceTime you for a few?" It's so simple and so courteous!

    I'll admit: Under the right circumstances an unexpected FaceTime call can be a delightful surprise. But if you randomly video chat someone without warning you shouldn't get your hopes up. Assume that they won't answer, and if they don't and you really need them to because you have big news like you just got engaged or something, text them to communicate the urgency and I'm sure they'll reconsider.

    I love to FaceTime, don't get me wrong. It's an intimate form of communication and a great way to keep in touch in a pandemic. I, a walking ball of anxiety, merely ask that you let me prepare for it.

  • The pandemic offered a unique chance for many people to come out as queer

    The pandemic offered a unique chance for many people to come out as queer

    Alyssa McGill came of age in the mid-1990s, when former President Clinton established homophobic doctrines like Don't Ask, Don't Tell and the Defense of Marriage Act. Both of those have since been abolished and acceptance of LGBTQ people(Opens in a new tab) has increased in the United States and throughout the world.

    (图1)

    Still, the revelation that she's a lesbian proved challenging.

    "I grappled with emotions, like wondering why I didn't realize it more fully sooner," said McGill, who questioned her sexuality for years prior, "and if that made me less gay."

    She was married to a man for ten years before divorcing in 2018. During the pandemic, she finally came to the conclusion that she's a lesbian, and is now in a relationship with a woman.

    McGill isn't alone in this newfound identity shift. There's no evidenced-based research as of yet, but throughout the pandemic, a lot of people like McGill have been coming out as a different gender identity or sexuality — to themselves or others.

    Several pandemic conditions may have nudged these people along this path of self-discovery. That's not to say they wouldn't have come out if the pandemic didn't happen. As time passes people may grow and have a truer understanding of themself. Ultimately, however, it's a moot point: We'll never know what would've occurred if coronavirus didn't exist.

    In terms of gender identity, the number of people coming out as trans or nonbinary in the United States has skyrocketed over the past decade said Dr. Cary Gabriel Costello(Opens in a new tab), associate professor of sociology and the director of the LGBTQ+ Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

    "Part of the sense that more people were coming out as trans/nonbinary/GNC [gender nonconforming] in the past year could be explained by that larger trend, rather than the pandemic," he said.

    Costello and other experts do believe, however, that the pandemic has engendered some sort of coming out trend. "I agree that it seems there has been a boost in the number of people coming out," he said, "and that this relates to the pandemic."

    Isolation and self-reflection

    The pandemic's impact on us and society has been layered, and we probably won't know the full extent of it for a long time. One COVID effect that has been abundantly clear since the start, though, is enforced and prolonged isolation.

    Many of us no longer had to commute or go to offices. Happy hours and dinners and nights out stopped. For some that meant being shut in with spouses and children and family in a constant blur state, but for others that meant being completely alone for huge stretches of time.

    Solitude gives room for self-reflection that some may hitherto never had. Our days were suddenly quiet, our routines slowed to a crawl. In silence "people discover things about themselves that they may have known all along, or were afraid to admit," said Silvia M. Dutchevici(Opens in a new tab), psychotherapist and founder of the Critical Therapy Center.

    In this way, according to Costello, the pandemic may have accelerated the timelines of people's self-realization. McGill believes this to be true in her case: While she questioned her sexuality long before COVID, she said it "sped along" her actualization. "The pandemic gave me a lot of downtime to reflect on what I wanted in life and what was keeping me from getting there," McGill said.

    In solitude, we don't see anyone — and no one sees us, either. We're forced to confront who we are when we're alone and thus who we are in public. Are we performing? Who are we performing for?

    Credit: bob al-greene / mashable

    An anonymous woman in Los Angeles told me she's begun questioning her gender and sexuality after spending a ton of time alone for the first time. Prior to the pandemic, she had an active social life and was out almost every night. She also thought she was a heterosexual cis woman before the pandemic, but the time away from others had led her to wonder.

    "Obviously I haven't [gone out] at all in the last year," she said, "and it's forced me to think about who I am when no one's watching."

    Others who are re-examining their identity echoed this sentiment, such as Rhiannon, a 29-year-old from South Africa, who came to terms with her queerness during the pandemic.

    "I had more time to sit with myself and wrestle with my identity, because I wasn't distracting myself with my work commute or socialising," said Rhiannon. "I had to fully submerge myself into this long-ignored part of my brain and actually have a conversation with myself about it, ask questions without judgment, and try to figure out what queerness looks like for me."

    The pandemic quickened timelines for some, said Costello, but for others, "it probably put an end to years of denial by removing a tactic of self-distraction via social busyness."

    Rhiannon related to this denial. Her mental health "crash," as she described it, happened after isolation and the fear of coronavirus forced her to confront feelings that she'd pretended hadn't been there for over a decade prior.

    Renhua, another person I spoke to going through this experience, came out as trans during the pandemic. They related to this pre-pandemic denial as well. "I believe if I had my usual daily distractions I would have put this thinking off longer," they said.

    Another anonymous person who's questioned their gender in the past year said that for a long time they've been uncomfortable with people using male pronouns for them. After going through a breakup in October, they had time for self-reflection thanks for the pandemic, and that motivated them to think about a lot of things. Reflection, beginning to casually date again, and speaking with people they know led to the conclusion that they're probably nonbinary. That could be chalked up to the breakup, anonymous commented, but "it's also the case that being single and alone during the pandemic is definitely a different feeling."

    "I had to fully submerge myself into this long-ignored part of my brain"

    It's more likely that these gender/sexuality thoughts have been somewhat latent than coming up for the first time, though that can also occur. Sarah Harte(Opens in a new tab), LICSW and director at mental health treatment community The Dorm(Opens in a new tab), told Mashable that most people typically have ideas about their gender/sexuality, even from early childhood.

    "It's not as much necessarily 'realizing' it for the first time — although that probably has happened as well — but it's about being able to hear that quiet voice inside of them or spending more time just with themselves," said Harte. "Coming to the point of saying, 'I do want to live within my true self and my true identities instead of feeling pressure to feel closeted.'"

    This was the case for Alison, a woman in New York City, whose attraction for women came to light during the pandemic. Her four-year relationship with a man ended ten days before her office told her to work from home and the city shut down last year.

    "It's something that has been festering for years, so it's not a complete revelation," she said of her queerness, "but the extraordinary amount of time spent alone, without human interaction or contact, and especially after ending a close and happy hetero relationship has in some ways given me the space to realize it in a way I may have continued to ignore or suppress if it were not for the pandemic."

    Further, without being able to rebound from her breakup, she was able to mentally explore her fantasies and what she actually desired. If the pandemic didn't happen, Alison said, she may not have realized the extent of her bisexuality because, in her words, she "would have buried those desires."

    Related Video: 10 essential LGBTQ films to stream

    The power of existential crises

    Before the pandemic, 27-year-old Kelsea thought she was bisexual. Throughout several months last year, however, she came to the conclusion that she's a lesbian.

    "There would be nights that would keep me up saying that I don’t want to die having kept this part of myself locked away," she said. "I was tired of trying to fit in a box."

    For many, COVID has caused literal or figurative brushes with death. When people confront their own mortality, Costello explained, it prompts them to cease delaying important steps they have planned to take "some day."

    "Longstanding cultural traditions of deathbed confessions get triggered under such circumstances, as is the advice to get our affairs in order," said Costello. This prompts coming out.

    Existential crises force us to face who we are, who want to be, and how we want to show up in the world. Kelsea began the pandemic in a relationship with a man, and now she's with a woman.

    How social media impacts identity

    People have been exploring queer identities online since the internet was invented, said Costello. Over time, online spaces have become increasingly public. That's not to say private groups and forums don't exist anymore — they certainly do — but the trend has been towards social currency in the form of followers, which encourages public posting.

    "One result of this has been greater awareness on the part of cis straight people that members of their social circles are exploring their sexual or gender identities," Costello said. "Instead of carrying those explorations out in physical spaces away from cis and/or straight people, many individuals now carrying them out by trying out shifted gender presentations on Instagram, or tweeting out queer cultural references."

    Anonymous in LA, in her mid-30s, experienced this while scrolling through TikTok. "I started watching all these TikToks of all these really cute queer Gen Zers," she said. She named one specific TikTok(Opens in a new tab) she stumbled upon, by user Tayler @worms.forbrains, featuring themself flipping from masculine to feminine outfits.

    "I really relate to this [TikTok]," anonymous said. "I relate to having days where I want to wear a silk dress and then having days where I just fully am dressed like a boy."

    On Tayler's TikTok profile, they say any pronouns work for them. Anonymous continued, "When I looked at their profile and they said 'any pronouns,' I was like, 'Okay, I definitely don't feel like a they/them — but I also kind of like this 'any pronouns' thing."

    More broadly, the internet has enabled access to information previously not widely available, and access to like-minded people. If you've never met someone queer in person, it's easy to do so online.

    During the pandemic, most if not all of our social interactions are online. This could enable people to explore aspects of their lives they've hidden from others or themselves, said Mary Bernstein(Opens in a new tab), professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut.

    Credit: bob al-greene / mashable

    Being forced online allowed Rhiannon to interact with fellow queer people without the potential friction of physical spaces, such as not feeling queer enough. "Because of the pandemic, I got to connect with new people who fully owned their sexual and gender identities who showed me what it could be like to be brave and fully accepting of yourself," she said, "without the pressure of feeling like I wasn't gay or bisexual 'enough' to join local queer clubs or hang out in queer bars."

    Perhaps Rhiannon discovered what social scientists have, according to Costello: That online interactions aren't distinct from "real life." They are just as real as face-to-face interactions, even if some elements differ.

    Social media is unique from film and TV, too, because we — "regular" people — are the ones making the content. "It's people like you and me," said Dutchevici. "Then people are like, 'Oh, well if they can do this, maybe I can explore, too.'"

    The internet can also bring solace to people who don't have an in-person support system, say if they live with homophobic or transphobic parents. The pandemic has been especially traumatic for these people, Costello noted. The amount of students in his LGBTQ+ Studies-affiliated course (where the majority are in the community) reporting somewhat or very bad mental health since lockdown is an alarming 65 percent.

    Coming out isn't just for teenagers

    An ageist misconception is that coming out is for the "young."

    "The psychologists' narrative that people come out as LGBTQ+ some time in their teens as a natural part of adolescence ignores the social factors that keep people from doing that," said Costello. Those in homophobic/transphobic households, for example, may only come out after they leave said household.

    Further, capitalism and patriarchy function in such a way to keep us busy, to not think beyond our routines. When we're hustling to survive, we don't question ourselves or society, Dutchevici noted. We don't think of how compulsory heterosexuality(Opens in a new tab) and the like may have gotten hold of us; we don't contemplate our deepest selves or desires.

    This misconception was even present in those interviewed. Rhiannon said she's still struggling with questions like, is she allowed to call herself queer if she just realized at 28? The answer is a resounding yes — but among a culture that prizes early coming out and ignores all the reasons that may not happen, it's an understandable concern.

    "I'm nearing 30 and have no actual experience with women, it's almost like the thought of going back to grad school at this point," joked Alison, "sounds great in theory but not sure the timing makes sense for me." Dating after the pandemic sounds scary enough, she said, without considering exploring dating women.

    "I don’t want to die having kept this part of myself locked away"

    The uncertain future

    It's a weird time for all of us, let alone those undergoing these identity shifts. Flirting, dating, hooking up — it's through these activities that people explore and figure out who they are, Costello said, and those exploring right now can't experience them.

    A common refrain is that this summer will be the "whoring 20s,"(Opens in a new tab) an absolute free-for-all for fully vaccinated people, especially now that the CDC deemed it okay(Opens in a new tab) for those to mingle up close and mask-free.

    Imagining life once herd immunity is reached is exciting, yes, but it's also anxiety-inducing(Opens in a new tab). No one can say with any certainty what post-pandemic life will look like. Add a new element of your identity to the mix, and that anxiety may be compounded.

    My Mashable colleague Alex Humphreys came out as trans and began hormone replacement therapy (HRT) shortly before quarantine began and described their journey as both great and terrible. "On one hand I really got to sit with my identity in this incubation period and really explore this kind of newfound gender euphoria," they said, evoking the term describing the joy trans people can experience when living as their true gender (seen as the opposite, in a sense, to gender dysmorphia).

    "On the other hand, it’s been a year since I've spent a good amount of time in public and I exist in those spaces very differently now," Humphreys said. Thinking about returning to "normal" life overwhelms them because they now have to consider things like bathrooms and doctors.

    "I knew the world existed in a binary before I came out and made all these choices, but now I'm really going to have to live in it and that's scary," they said, "and exciting."

    Anonymous in Los Angeles believes the future of her gender and sexuality journey can go in one of two directions.

    "I could start dating a dude and be like, 'That was a weird time that I was confused when I was in quarantine,'" she said, "or this could be a very real moment of clarity, and I could end up being a different person after this."

    Any fear McGill has, however, is outweighed by excitement and relief. "I'll never regret my previous relationships, in particular my marriage that garnered my children," she said, "but in some ways, I feel like an adolescent who is just starting to date. Everything is new and familiar at the same time."

  • Todays best deals: A sub-$50 Gourmia air fryer, $250 off a Samsung Galaxy Book, the first real disco

    Todays best deals: A sub-$50 Gourmia air fryer, $250 off a Samsung Galaxy Book, the first real discount on the 2022 iPad Pro, and more

    Check out the best deals from everyone's favorite big box retailers on Nov. 10:

    (图1)

    • BEST HOME DEAL: Gourmia Digital Air Fryer with Guided Cooking (6-quart)(Opens in a new tab)$38 $99.99 (save $61.99)

    • BEST TECH DEAL: Samsung 13.3-inch Galaxy Book Flex2 Alpha QLED Touch-Screen Laptop (Core i5, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$499.99 $849.99 (save $350)


    Walmart, Best Buy, and Amazon are fighting for your Benjamins this season. And, we must say, each store is doing a great job. Walmart's first Deals for Days(Opens in a new tab) drop on Monday brought us some of the lowest prices we've seen on kitchen appliances and floor care products (many of which are still live). Best Buy has been steadily handing out tech deals like they're candy since October. And Amazon keeps on mixing up a little bit of everything for a pot full of tasty savings.

    We can certainly expect the deals to keep rolling in for the rest of the holiday season, but here are the best ones you can shop on Nov. 10.

    Best home deal

    (Opens in a new tab)
    Credit: Gourmia
    Gourmia Digital Air Fryer with Guided Cooking (6-Quart) (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)
    $38 at Walmart (save $61.99)
    (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)

    Back on the shelves after selling out, Walmart's Black Friday deal on the Gourmia Digital Air Fryer is nearly too good to be true. Its six-quart capacity can feed a whole family, while its 12 preset one-touch cooking functions and guided cooking feature make whipping up meals a breeze. The basket-style fryer is regularly $100, but you can pick it up at Walmart for only $38 if you act fast. There's no telling how long the deal will stick around this time.

    More home deals

    • Cuisinart 12 -Piece Multi-Color Knife Set(Opens in a new tab)$12.99 $49.99 (save $37)

    • Keurig K-Express Essentials Single Serve Coffee Maker(Opens in a new tab)$35 $79.99 (save $44.99)

    • Gourmia Digital Air Fryer with Guided Cooking (6-quart)(Opens in a new tab)$38 $99.99 (save $61.99)

    • Bella Pro Series Digital Air Fryer with Divided Basket (8-quart)(Opens in a new tab)$49.99 $109.99 (save $60)

    • Instant Pot Duo (6-Quart)(Opens in a new tab)$50 $99.99 (save $49.99)

    • Hoover MAXLife PowerDrive Swivel XL Bagless Upright Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$59 $119 (save 60)

    • Shark Wand Vac Cord-Free Handheld Multi Surface Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$64 $99 (save $35)

    • Shark Navigator Lift-Away Upright Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$98 $199 (save $101)

    • Costway Tilt-Head Stand Mixer (7.5-Quart)(Opens in a new tab)$99.99 $178 (save $78.01)

    • Shark Pet Cordless Stick Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$144 $259 (save $115)

    • iRobot Roomba 676 Robot Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$177 $269 (save $92)

    • Shark EZ Robot Vacuum with Self-Empty Base(Opens in a new tab)$258 $449 (save $191)

    • Breville Smart Oven Air Fryer Toaster Oven(Opens in a new tab)$279.95 $349.95 (save $70)

    • iRobot Roomba i1+ (1552) Wi-Fi Connected Self-Emptying Robot Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$288 $529.99 (save $241.99)

    • Dyson Pure Cool Purifying Fan TP01(Opens in a new tab)$299.99 $399.99 (save $100)

    • Breville Smart Oven Air Fryer Pro(Opens in a new tab)$319.95 $499.95 (save $180)

    • Dyson Ball Animal 3 Extra Upright Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$399.99 $499.99 (save $100)

    • iRobot Roomba J7+ Robot Vacuum(Opens in a new tab)$599 $799.99 (save $200.99)

    Best computer deal

    (Opens in a new tab)
    Credit: Samsung
    Samsung 13.3-inch Galaxy Book Flex2 Alpha QLED Laptop (Intel Core i5, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD) (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)
    $499.99 at Best Buy (save $350)
    (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)

    Designed to move with you, the Samsung Galaxy Book Flex2 Alpha Laptop is lightweight, slim, and flexible. The magic of its 2-in-1 touch-screen design allows you to go between laptop mode and tablet mode for on-the-go convenience. Meanwhile, its 17-hour battery life ensures all-day capability. It's regularly priced at $849.99 for the 8GB RAM, 256GB storage configuration, but with this daily deal at Best Buy, it's yours for only $499.99. That's $350 in savings.

    More computer, tablet, and monitor deals

    • HP 11.6-inch Chromebook (AMD A4, 4GB RAM, 32GB eMMC)(Opens in a new tab)$79 $98 (save $19)

    • Lenovo Tab M8 (3rd Gen) 8-inch Tablet (MediaTek Helio P22T, 3GB RAM, 32GB eMCP)(Opens in a new tab)$79 $119 (save $40)

    • Samsung Galaxy Tab A8 10.5-inch Tablet (WiFi, 32GB)(Opens in a new tab)$159 $229 (save $70)

    • LG 27-inch UltraGear FHD 165Hz Gaming Monitor(Opens in a new tab)$179 $229 (save $50)

    • LG 32-inch UltraGear QHD (2560x1440)165Hz HDR 10 Monitor with FreeSync(Opens in a new tab)$200 $399 (save $199)

    • HP OMEN 27-inch IPS LED QHD FreeSync and G-Sync Compatible Gaming Monitor(Opens in a new tab)$249.99 $399.99 (save $150)

    • ASUS VivoBook 15 OLED K513 (Core i5, 12GB RAM, 512GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$629.99 $799.99 (save $170)

    • ROG Strix G10 Gaming Desktop (Core i5, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$739.99 $1,129.99 (save $390)

    • 2022 Apple 11-inch iPad Pro WiFi (M2, 8GB RAM, 128GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$749 $799 (save $50)

    • Acer Predator Helios 300 15.6-inch FHD 165Hz Gaming Laptop (Intel Core i7, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$999.99 $1,499.99 (save $500)

    • 2021 Apple 12.9-inch iPad Pro WiFi + Cellular (M1, 8GB RAM, 128GB SSD)(Opens in a new tab)$1,099 $1,299 (save $200)

    Audio deals

    • Google Nest Mini (2nd Generation)(Opens in a new tab)$18 $49 (save $31)

    • JBL Flip 4 Waterproof Portable Bluetooth Speaker(Opens in a new tab)$59 $99 (save $40)

    • Samsung Galaxy Buds2 (Lavender)(Opens in a new tab)$85.49 $149.99 (save $64.50)

    • Samsung 170W 2.1ch Soundbar with Wireless Subwoofer(Opens in a new tab)$99 $149 (save $50)

    Amazon device deals

    • Ring Video Doorbell Pro and Ring Chime Pro(Opens in a new tab) — $149.99 $219.99 (save $70)

    • Amazon Fire TV 43-inch 4-Series 4K UHD Smart TV(Opens in a new tab)$249.99 $369.99 (save $120)

    • Amazon Fire TV 75-inch Omni Series 4K UHD Smart TV(Opens in a new tab)$599.99 $1,099.99 (save $500)

    • Amazon eero Pro 6E mesh Wi-Fi System(Opens in a new tab)$419 $699 (save $280)

    Streaming devices and subscription deals

    • One month of Paramount+(Opens in a new tab)free with code BRAVO $4.99 (save $4.99)

    • One year of Grubhub+(Opens in a new tab)free for Prime members $119.88 (save $119.88)

    • First month of Xbox Game Pass(Opens in a new tab)$1 $14.99 (save $13.99)

    • Four months of Audible Premium Plus(Opens in a new tab)$5.95/month $14.95/month (save $36)

    • Chromecast with Google TV (HD) Streaming Device(Opens in a new tab)$18 $29.99 (save $11.99)

    • Roku Streaming Stick 4K Streaming Device(Opens in a new tab)$24.98 $49 (save $24.02)

    • One year of Paramount+ with Free Fire TV Stick Lite(Opens in a new tab)starting at $24.99 (save 50%)

    • Apple TV HD 32GB (2nd Generation)(Opens in a new tab)$77 $149.99 (save $72.99)

  • Want some holiday shopping advice? Stay in your car with curbside Pickup at Sam’s Club

    Want some holiday shopping advice? Stay in your car with curbside Pickup at Sam’s Club

    You Got This is a series that spotlights the gear you need to improve one area of your life. If you buy something from this post, we may earn an affiliate commission.

    (图1)


    Remember the days of wandering the mall and snacking on a huge pretzel from the food court while you casually browsed for gifts? Fast forward to 2020 and the goal for holiday shopping this season is to be safely tucked away, not touching things.

    So, why should you do Sam’s Club(Opens in a new tab) curbside Pickup instead of Prime delivery or (gasp) your usual in-store shopping? Let us count the ways.

    Slay your list via your phone(Opens in a new tab)

    Next time your roomie is gabbing your ear off, grab your phone and tackle your list on the Sam’s Club app. You can also buy just one thing, like a new pair of noise-canceling earbuds. You’ll still get free Pickup.

    Stay in the car(Opens in a new tab)

    Fill your virtual cart with a new Samsung Tab(Opens in a new tab) for nana, a Norelco shaver(Opens in a new tab) for your pops, and a DiGiorno frozen pizza(Opens in a new tab) for dinner, choose a pickup time, and then park it while the pros load the trunk.

    Save big with no delivery fees(Opens in a new tab)

    Get in on a Sam’s Club Plus membership(Opens in a new tab) for $100 a year and curbside Pickup is always free. Even Basic members, who pay just $45 a year, can get free Pickup right now for a limited time.

    Skip the crowds and schedule your Pickup(Opens in a new tab)

    Pickup is from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. every day, but one of the perks of being a Plus member is that you get special curbside service starting at 7 a.m. Monday through Saturday. Early bird gets it every time.

    Slack and shop at the same time(Opens in a new tab)

    If you’re tethered to your desk all day, do your shopping while waiting for that video meeting to start. Then take your desk on the go as you fire off some emails while parked in the Sam’s Club Pickup spot. Ah, multitasking.

    Get your goods same-day(Opens in a new tab)

    If you’re used to two-day delivery schedules, then Sam’s Club Pickup will feel like warp speed. Some orders of 10 items or less can be picked up in a measly four hours.

    Never sweat stolen packages(Opens in a new tab)

    If you’re still waiting for that hot pot you ordered weeks ago, Pickup delivers the goods straight to your car. Nothing’s lost in transit or ripe for package thieves.

    (Opens in a new tab)
    Credit: SAM'S CLUB
    Get free curbside pickup with a $100 Sam's Club yearly membership (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab) (opens in a new tab) (Opens in a new tab)

  • Why did YouTube spotlight a scammer and an accused abuser at its latest event?

    Why did YouTube spotlight a scammer and an accused abuser at its latest event?

    In its effort to remain family-friendly and woo advertisers, YouTube has often struggled to please its vast, diverse community of creators. It seems that the brand's first-ever "Made on YouTube" event, held this morning, was an attempt to strengthen that relationship by showing creators how much YouTube cares about their work and revenue streams. Unfortunately, the event proved that they still have a ways to go.

    (图1)

    The event opened with a montage of popular creators making their first YouTube videos, reaching subscriber milestones, and saying nice things about all the opportunities YouTube has given them.

    SEE ALSO: YouTube Rewind is dead. Can Escape2021 take its place?

    It featured all the usual suspects — squeaky-clean YouTube corporate favorites Mark Rober, Marques Brownlee, Simone Giertz, and Binging with Babish, artists Dua Lipa, Lizzo, and Conan Grey, the platform's highest-earning creator MrBeast, and streamers TommyInnit, Dream, and Valkyrae. But two very surprising faces were also included: the ACE Family's Austin McBroom and comedian Gus Johnson.

    It's hard to explain just how incredibly odd and wildly out of touch these choices are, because they both represent parts of the platform YouTube would rather pretend didn't exist.

    A screenshot of a clip of Austin McBroom used during the Made on YouTube event. The cut is from an ACE Family video titled "2 MILLION ACE FAMILY MEMBERS!!!" posted in 2017. McBroom stares at a large television screen waiting for the channel's subscriber count to hit two million. Credit: YouTube / The ACE Family
    A screenshot of a clip of Gus Johnson used during the Made on YouTube event. The cut is from a video posted in 2021 titled "thank you for 3 million! (Q&A too)" and Johnson is heard saying "That blows my mind, so thank you!" Credit: YouTube/ Gus Johnson

    The ACE Family is notorious for a series of failed business ventures and scammy sales practices, and they've been loudly called out by the YouTube community since at least 2018. They're so well-known on the platform that anyone who has paid even a skosh of attention to YouTube in the past few years would be aware of their poor reputation.

    But, let's say you aren't on YouTube a whole lot. Simply Googling "the ACE family" brings up featured snippets with the questions like "what is the ACE Family controversy?" and "how much debt is the ACE Family in?" Just below that is a report from Insider(Opens in a new tab) on the family's shady business dealings.

    Googling "the ACE family" brings up featured snippet with the questions "What is the ACE family controversy?" and "How much debt is the ACE Family in?" Credit: Google

    Gus Johnson, meanwhile, was a popular creator until late last year when his ex-girlfriend Abelina Rios accused him(Opens in a new tab) of emotional abuse and neglect as she struggled with an ectopic pregnancy that almost killed her. Rios had been part of content on Johnson's channel between 2018 and 2020, and their videos together are still up on the channel. As Newsweek recapped(Opens in a new tab), Johnson made an apology for his behavior, which Rios did not accept.

    Johnson's channel has since taken a significant hit in subscriber count and viewership after Rio's went public with her side of the story. He's lost more than 350,000 subscribers since Rio's video was published. That makes it even weirder that YouTube highlighted him in a celebratory medley of creators.

    Johnson's weekly subscribers and view counts gains, which dipped after his ex-girlfriend shared her story of emotional abuse in October 2021.. Credit: Socialblade

    So, what the hell happened here?

    It's no secret that YouTube is fighting a constant battle against its ignorance of its own platform. But to show their cards at this event, in particular, is embarrassing. It'd be one thing to feed McBroom and Johnson to advertisers who are more interested in a creator's shiny facade than the intricacies of their reputation in the YouTube community. But it's another thing entirely to highlight McBroom and Johnson at an event for creators, held specifically to convince creators that you understand them.

    The choice proves just how out of touch YouTube remains when it comes to the issues in their community, and why an event like "Made on YouTube" might still fall flat for the very creators it's meant to serve.

  • Sen. Chris Murphy begs Congress for gun control in impactful speech

    Sen. Chris Murphy begs Congress for gun control in impactful speech

    The congressman who once served as the representative for the town of Sandy Hook gave a rousing viral speech in the wake of the Uvalde, Texas elementary school shooting in which an 18-year-old killed at least 19 children and two adults(Opens in a new tab).

    (图1)

    "What are we doing?" Connecticut Democratic Senator Chris Murphy asked his colleagues repeatedly, in an impassioned speech on the Senate floor on Tuesday, begging them to pass legislation to stop the nation's gun violence crisis.

    During his speech, Murphy put his hands together and pleaded with Republicans to help Democrats pass meaningful gun reform legislation. "I am here on this floor to beg, to literally get down on my hands and knees to beg my colleagues: Find a path forward here."

    "Why do you go through all the hassle of getting this job, or putting yourself in a position of authority if your answer is that as this slaughter increases, as our kids run for their lives, we do nothing," he asked his Republican colleagues. While Republicans are often blamed(Opens in a new tab) for their devotion(Opens in a new tab) to the gun lobby(Opens in a new tab) despite continuous death across the U.S., Democrats, for their part, have also failed(Opens in a new tab) to pass any meaningful gun legislation(Opens in a new tab)

    What are we doing?

    "Just days after a shooter walked into a grocery store, to gun down African American patrons, we have another Sandy Hook on our hands," Murphy said, referencing first a deadly shooting in Buffalo in which a gunman killed 13 people, 11 of whom are Black(Opens in a new tab). He also mentioned the deadliest school shooting on record in which 26 people were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012, adding that "Sandy Hook will never ever be the same," and neither will this community in Texas. Since Sandy Hook, not much has been done to stop gun violence in the country.

    Sen. Murphy is calling for changes to legislation because, as he put, "this happens nowhere else but here in the United States of America." But his calls might be landing on deaf ears. According to the Swiss-based research project the Small Arms Survey, there were 390 million guns in circulation in the U.S. in 2018 — that's twice as many guns in circulation than the nation with the second highest number of gun ownership, according to the BBC(Opens in a new tab).

    "This isn’t inevitable. These kids weren’t unlucky. This only happens in this country and nowhere else," Murphy said. "It is a choice. It is our choice to let it continue."

    This only happens in this country and nowhere else.

    "I don't really have a good understanding why [there hasn't been more gun control legislation]," Ron Avi Astor, a mass shooting expert and UCLA professor, told NPR of the lack of change since Sandy Hook(Opens in a new tab). "Maybe it is money. Maybe it is the gun lobby. Maybe it's become politicized and an ideological thing, but it should be treated as a public health measure."

    Murphy told reporters after his speech that the line Republicans tend(Opens in a new tab) to use in the(Opens in a new tab) wake of mass shootings(Opens in a new tab) — blaming mental illness among the perpetrators — is a "bullshit" excuse. According to the Educational Fund to Stop Gun Violence(Opens in a new tab), people with mental illnesses are more likely to be victims of violence than perpetrators of it.

    "We don’t have any more mental illness than any other country in the world. You cannot explain this through a prism of mental illness because we’re not an outlier on mental illness," Murphy told reporters, according to the Guardian(Opens in a new tab). "We’re an outlier when it comes to access to firearms and the ability of criminals and very sick people to get their arms on firearms. That’s what makes America different."

  • Roe reversal is impacting how people are dating

    Roe reversal is impacting how people are dating

    The effects of the overturning of Roe v. Wade, which shattered the precedent for both the right to privacy and abortion in the U.S., are still rippling months later. In addition to steering recent politics, it's also impacting interpersonal relationships — romantic and not.

    (图1)

    In the latest Singles in America(Opens in a new tab) survey, an annual study of over 5,000 single people in the country conducted by Match, these effects are evident. Over 75 percent — 78, to be exact — of singles of reproductive age said that the overturning of Roe changed their sex life. This is understandable, considering the increased risk of a sexual encounter, and it's especially true for young people. 

    Here's a breakdown of how it's specifically impacting daters:

    • 25 percent overall (28 percent of Gen Z) say they'll use or ask their partners to use condoms more often

    • 20 percent overall (27 percent of Gen Z) are more hesitant to have sex

    • 20 percent overall (27 percent of Gen Z) are more afraid of getting pregnant or getting someone pregnant

    These fears translate into a change of dating habits. Some people, 13 percent according to Match, said the SCOTUS decision made them more hesitant to date. 

    Two out of three single women will not date a partner who has opposing views of abortion. Some, however, are tired of talking about it: A quarter of single women want to have less discussion about abortion attitudes with partners. That doesn't account for everyone, though; 18 percent want to have more discussion about abortion attitudes. 

    SEE ALSO: Feeling lost? Follow these reproductive justice accounts.

    Whether someone wants to talk about abortion or not, apolitical views aren't wanted for about a third of people surveyed. Thirty-one percent of singles who said not having an opinion on key issues is a dealbreaker. For around the same number of singles, 31 percent, posting political views on social media is also a dealbreaker. These numbers are up from 16 percent and 11 percent in 2017 respectfully, an outcome of increasing political polarization

    On the opposite side of the coin, 37 percent say that "having too strong an opinion is a dealbreaker."

    Both two major parties have their detractors, though Republicans more so: 33 percent of singles say supporting the GOP is a dealbreaker. For Democrats, that number is 23 percent. 

    On top of this, the Roe decision is influencing platonic relationships: 17 percent of singles have lost friends due to their differing abortion opinions.

    Singles in America breaks down other topics relevant to daters, as well, but it's clear that politics and Roe in general are at the top of some minds. As we continue to navigate a post-Roe world, we'll continue to see consequences, from the macro of elections impacted to the micro of one person's dating life.

  • 11 best tweets of the week, including raccoons on boars and a cheese wheel

    11 best tweets of the week, including raccoons on boars and a cheese wheel

    It's Friday! How 'bout that? What a world. What a thing, the passage of the time.

    (图1)

    We're already halfway through April. How in the heck did that happen?

    Anyway, we rounded up some of our favorite tweets from this week, just like we always do. Why? Because laughing is good.

    So here they are, our 11 favorite tweets of the week.

    1. Sounds like a perfect day

    CARD ID: 539837

    2. I can't stop staring at this perfect short story. I've never seen the Northern Lights but I imagine reading this tweet is like seeing like the Northern Lights.

    CARD ID: 539838

    3. Who could've known Werner Herzog speaking about skating could be so pure?

    CARD ID: 539839

    4. Just a reminder about the vax rules

    5. How does this happen? And why? And...you know what...I'm asking too many questions. This is meant to be enjoyed, not analyzed. No thoughts. Just raccoon on a hog.

    CARD ID: 539841

    6. The "you can be a different person" memes ruled

    CARD ID: 539842

    7. What a fond memory to recover

    CARD ID: 539843

    8. An obligatory dril tweet

    CARD ID: 539845

    9. And another

    CARD ID: 539846

    10. I don't know the full story behind this and I refuse to learn more than this badass jump

    11. And finally, a perfect date

  • How to zoom out on an Apple Watch

    How to zoom out on an Apple Watch

    There are two types of Apple Watch users: Those who have the zoom feature turned on and those who have it turned off.

    (图1)

    If you're the type who needs to see content up close, then you might find the Apple Watch's display stuck on magnified mode at some point while using it. Don't worry, getting back to full view is as simple as tapping on the display.

    Here's how to zoom out on your Apple Watch display.

    Double-tap with two fingers

    Double-tap to zoom in and double-tap to zoom out. Credit: apple / screenshot
    You can zoom all the way out using the Digital Crown in Grid View. Credit: Apple / screenshot

    Zooming out on the Apple Watch is as simple as zooming in — all you have to do is tap the display twice with two fingers.

    If you're on the main display in Grid View (where all your apps are scattered across the screen), you can also rotate the Digital Crown counter-clockwise to zoom out even further.

    How to adjust or disable zoom on Apple Watch

    You can adjust the zoom level via Settings. Credit: apple / screenshot
    You can also turn the feature off completely. Credit: apple / screenshot

    Zoom is also adjustable on the Apple Watch. Go to Settings > Accessibility > Zoom. At the bottom of the display is a slider that allows you to adjust the maximum zoom level.

    If you find yourself getting super annoyed at the functionality, you can turn the feature off. Simply go to Settings > Accessibility > Zoom and toggle it off.

    You can also adjust or disable Zoom using the Watch app on your iPhone. Credit: screenshot / apple

    You can also access both of these settings using your iPhone via the Watch app. Simply go to Settings > Accessibility > Zoom.